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ANDREA CREECH

Thinker. Researcher. Teacher.

Andrea Creech is a well-established Professional Academic and musician who believes in collaborative learning and in-depth practice-oriented research. Drawing from extensive research and professional musical experience, she lectures, publishes and speaks with an intellectual confidence and depth of understanding about a variety of topics concerned with musical development across the lifespan.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Dr  Andrea  Creech  is  Professor  of  DidactiqueInstrumentale  at  the  Faculty  of  Music,  Université  Laval,  where  she  holds  a  Canada  Research  Chair  in  music  in  community  (funded  by  the  Social  Sciences  and  Humanities  Research  Council  of Canada)  and  is  Director  of  the  Mobile  Laboratory  for  Research  in  Music  in  Community  (funded  by  the  Canadian  Fund  for  Innovation).  Following  an  international  orchestral  and  teaching  career  Andrea  was  awarded  a  PhD  inPsychology  in  Education  from  the  Institute  of  Education,  University  of  London.    Andrea’s  research  has  covered  a  wide  range  of  issues  in  formal  and  informal  music  education  contexts,  including  interpersonal  dynamics  in  instrumental  learning  and  teaching,  informal  learning  in  school  music,  inclusion,  and  music  for  positive  youth  development.  Her  current  research  focuses  on  intergenerational  and  later-life  music-making  in  community  contexts,  and  addresses  questions  relating  to  the  social  and  emotional  outcomes  associated  with  music  learning  and  participation,  as  well  as  the  pedagogies  and  facilitation  approaches  that  can  support  positive  musical  experience.  Andrea  has  presented  at  international  conferences  and  published  widely  on  topics  concerned  with  musical  development  and  lifelong  learning  and  participation  in  the  arts.,  including  the  Music  for  Life  Project,  funded  by  the  UK  Research  Councils  and  winner  of  the  Royal  Society  for  Public  Health’s  award  for  research  in  Arts  and  Health,  2014.  She  is  Senior  Fellow  of  the  UK  Higher  Education  Academy  and  Graduate  Member  of  the  British  Psychological  Association.    Andrea  is  Editor  of  Psychology  of  Music,  co-author  of  Active  Ageing  with  Music,  and  co-editor  of  Music  Education  in  the  21st  Century  in  the  UK.

 

PUBLISHED WORK

Highlights below.
Please visit ResearchGate and Orchid Profiles for extensive publication list.

CREECH,  A.,  HALLAM,  S.,  VARVARIGOU,  M.,  &  MCQUEEN,  H.  (2014).  
ACTIVE  AGEING  WITH  MUSIC:   SUPPORTING  WELL  BEING  IN  THE  THIRD  AND  FOURTH  AGES.  LONDON:  IOE  PRESS.

Active  Ageing  with  Music  explores  the  powerful  potential  for  active  music-making  to  support  wellbeing  among  older  people.  Supported  by  strong  evidence,  Active  Ageing  with  Music  balances  research  with  practice,  including:  •  Practical  issues  of  accessibility  and  resources  •  Potential  barriers  to  participation  –  structural,  intrapersonal,  social  –  alongside  case-studies  of  potential  solutions  •  Supporting  principles  and  practices  for  facilitating  groups  of  older  people,  especially  musical  groups  The  book  will  be  of  interest  to  all  academics  and  practitioners  interested  in  music  psychology,  the  impact  of  music  on  wellbeing,  and  leading  musical  activities  with  older  people,  as  well  as  occupational  therapists  and  community  musicians.  Most  importantly,  Active  Ageing  with  Music  will  be  of  interest  to  people  who  want  to  preserve  and  sustain  their  cognitive,  social,  and  emotional  wellbeing  throughout  the  latter  stages  of  their  lives.

HALLAM,  S.,  &  CREECH,  A.  (EDS.).  (2010).
MUSIC  EDUCATION  IN  THE  21ST  CENTURY  IN  THE  UNITED  KINGDOM:  ACHIEVEMENTS,  ANALYSIS  AND  ASPIRATIONS.  LONDON:  INSTITUTE  OF  EDUCATION,  LONDON.

Written  by  experts  in  the  field  of  music  education,  the  book  provides  an  authoritative  account  of  the  current  status  of  music  education  in  the  UK.  While  essential  to  understand  the  current  and  future  context  in  the  UK,  the  book  will  be  invaluable  to  those  involved  in  music  education  internationally,  as  it  includes  chapters  on  the  provision  of  music  education  for  all  children,  listening,  the  role  of  singing,  playing  an  instrument,  creativity,  the  role  of  technology,  issues  of  performance  and  assessment,  learning  through  the  lifespan  and  the  initial  and  ongoing  education  of  music  teachers.  It  also  includes  a  range  of  case  study  examples  and  evaluations  of  practice.

CREECH,  A.,  HALLAM,  S.,  MCQUEEN,  H.,  &  VARVARIGOU,  M.  (2013).  
THE  POWER  OF  MUSIC  IN  THE  LIVES  OF  OLDER  ADULTS.
RESEARCH  STUDIES  IN  MUSIC  EDUCATION,  35(1),  83  -  98.

A  compelling  body  of  research  demonstrates  that  music  continues  to  offer  powerful  potential  for  enhancing  health  and  well-being  in  old  age.  Active  music-making  has  been  found  to  provide  a  source  of  enhanced  social  cohesion,  enjoyment,  personal  development,  and  empowerment,  and  to  contribute  to  recovery  from  depression  and  maintenance  of  personal  well-being  throughout  these  latter  stages  of  adult  life.  Within  a  context  where  life  expectancy  at  age  65  years  is  rising  rapidly  and  yet  where  increasing  numbers  of  older  people  are  reported  to  be  living  in  isolation  or  suffering  from  depression,  this  body  of  research  has  important  implications  for  understanding  how  access  to  active  music-making  may  enhance  the  lives  of  older  people.  This  article  reviews  a  body  of  literature  relating  to  specific  benefits  of  active  participation  in  music-making  amongst  older  people.  A  case  study  is  presented,  illustrating  some  of  the  key  
points  from  the  literature.  Some  barriers  to  participation  are  identified  and  implications  for  older  people  and  their  carers  are  discussed.

CREECH,  A.  (2018).  
COMMUNITY-SUPPORTED  MUSIC-MAKING  AS  A  CONTEXT  FOR  POSITIVE  AND  CREATIVE  AGEING.  IN  L.  HIGGINS  &  B.-L.  BARTLEET  (EDS.),  OXFORD  HANDBOOK  OF  COMMUNITY  MUSIC.  NEW  YORK:  OXFORD  UNIVERSITY  PRESS.

Coinciding  with  the  extraordinary  demographic  transition  that  has  made  ageing  a  global  and  highly  relevant  political  issue,  there  has  been  increasing  interest  in  the  power  of  music  in  the  lives  of  older  people.  New  initiatives  have  been  developed  and  researchers  have  investigated  the  relationship  between  music  and  positive  ageing  from  a  number  of  perspectives.  In  this  chapter,  a  framework  for  positive  ageing,  comprising  the  dimensions  of  purpose,  autonomy,  and  social  affirmation,  underpins  my  critical  discussion  of  the  role  that  facilitated  music-making  can  take  in  mitigating  the  challenges  of  ageing.  Drawing  upon  international  evidence,  I  argue  that  active  engagement  in  participatory  music  in  community  offers  a  context  for  creative  expression  and  lifelong  musical  development,  supporting  cognitive,  social,  and  emotional  well-being  in  older  age.  However,  commitment  to  positive  ageing  requires  that  participation  must  be  inclusive  of  community  members  who  are  frail  and  in  need  of  care.  I  conclude  with  a  discussion  of  further  ways  in  which  community  musicians  could  enrich  the  contexts  that  older  people  inhabit.

 

FUNDED RESEARCH

Current projects are generously funded by the Social Sciences And Humanities Research Council of Canada, Age-Well, and the Observatoire Interdisciplinaire de Creation et de Recherche en Musique (Laval)

MAPPING  THE  MUSICAL  LIFECOURSE

First  meeting  of  our  new  international  network:    19-22  September  2018,  Université  Laval,  Québec, Canada

This  expert  seminar  focuses  on an  interdisciplinary,  international  perspective  to  mapping  the  musical  lifecourse,  and  highlights  a  deepening  social  responsibility  amongst  scholars  and  artists  concerned  with  learning  and  participation  in  music  across  the  lifecourse. International  experts  from  the  fields  of  Music  Education,  Psychology  of  Music,  Health  Humanities,  Community  Music,  Music  Therapy,  and  Music  Performance  will  engage  inknowledge  exchange  alongside  future  music  leaders  and  emergent  scholars. 


CREATIVE  LATER  LIFE  IN  A  DIGITAL  AGE

Mobilizing music and creative technologies for inclusive later-life musical learning and participation, creative expression, digital literacy, and quality of life.

This  cross-sector,  interdisciplinary  Partnership  is  focused  on  developing  understandings  of  how  Music  and  Creative  Technologies  (MaCT)  can  be  applied  in  ways  that  will  support  inclusive  opportunities  for  creative  expression,  lifelong  learning  and  participation,  and  enhanced  quality  of  later  life.  Our  partnership  is  founded  upon  the  idea  that  digital  music  technologies  offer  strong  potential  to:  serve  as  a  vehicle  whereby  older  people  may  overcome  barriers  to  creative  musical  engagement  and  maximize  the  potential  for  the  wider  benefits  of  music-making  to  enhance  their  quality  of  life;  and  function  as  a  context  where  the  generational  digital  divide  may  be  mediated.  Our  Partnership  is  designed  to:    1.mobilize  knowledge  from  cross-sector,  interdisciplinary,  and  intergenerational  perspectives  concerning  the  ways  in  which  music  technology  can  support  a  creative  later  life;    2.expand  the  opportunities  for  creative  expression  through  music,  amongst  older  people;  3.deepen  the  learning  and  engagement  of  older  people  in  our  digital  age  in  ways  they  will  find  meaningful  and  relevant;    4.create  resources  that  will  be  used  by  caregivers  and  community  music  leadersin  their  professional  practice.

MOBILE LABORATORY FOR RESEARCH IN MUSIC IN COMMUNITY

Supporting infrastructure for research on creative aging with music.

The  Mobile Laboratory for Research in Music in Community supports a program of research focusing on creative aging through music in community. This research investigates the sustained, protective value of creative music-making across the lifespan, using adaptive, and assistive technologies that support access to creative expression through music amongst elders, thus maximizing the potential for wide access to the psychological and physiological benefits of musical engagement.

PROMOTING QUALITY OF LIFE THROUGH CREATIVE AND COLLABORATIVE MUSIC-MAKING WITH AN ASSISTIVE DIGITAL MUSIC TECHNOLOGY

Creative music-making with assisstive digital music technology

This research explores the use of assistive music technology as a catalyst for creativity, collaboration, and enhanced quality of later-life within assisted living communities. Previous research has attributed significant social, emotional and cognitive benefits amongst senior citizens to their involvement in musical activities. However, research that addresses age-related barriers to ‘musicking’, which include the accessibility of conventional musical instruments, is limited. Our research will thus investigate systematically the use of an innovative assistive digital music technology that may mitigate such barriers, thus maximizing the potential for access to the creative, social, psychological, and physiological benefits of musical engagement in later-life. We will focus on the Soundbeam, an assistive digital music technology that uses motion sensors to translate body movements into music and sound. Soundbeam offers a stable and versatile technological platform that enables both touch and touch-free interaction in unlimited musical styles, as well as the built-in ability to record and share musical creations online, thus further promoting social connectedness. The feasibility of such technologies as tools to support creativity and quality of life amongst older people in assisted living contexts remains under-researched. Accordingly, we aim to improve the lives of Canadian seniors by: 1) engaging seniors in creative social practice through music and sound,  by developing novel musical practices and artefacts using the Soundbeam; 2) fostering creative musical collaborations, learning, and play that harness the potential of an assistive music technology within later-life contexts; and 3) exploring the feasibility of the Soundbeam as a tool that can contribute to enhanced quality of later-life. Our project will therefore make an original contribution to knowledge concerning the role of technology in creative arts-based approaches to enhancing the quality of later-life.

 

KEYNOTES

PROGRESSIVE  METHODS  IN  POPULAR  MUSIC  EDUCATION  SYMPOSIUM

Western  University,  Canada  June  8-9,  2018

Critical  reflections  on  progressive  methods  in  music  education:    student  and  teacher  experiences  and  perceptions 

In  this  paper  I  will  revisit  the  rationale  for  a  conversation  about  diversity  and  inclusion  in  music  education  in  the  21st  century,  and  will  raise  some  critical  questions  about  the  implications  for  practice.  What  are  the  characteristics  of  progressive  methods,  and  how  can  these  methods  respond  to  an  increasingly  diverse  society  and  pluralistic  culture?  Drawing  principally  on  research  carried  out  in  the  context  of  UK  Musical  Futures  Champion  Schools,  as  well  as  further  research  that  focused  on  the  relevance  of  the  secondary  school  music  curriculum  within  plural  communities  (where  there  is  no  one  single  majority  ethnic  group),  I  will  consider  student  and  teacher  perceptions  and  experience  of  formal  as  well  as  informal  pedagogies  within  secondary  school  contexts.  I  will  furthermore  raise  some  critical  issues  that  may  arise  at  the  intersection  of  formal  music  education  with  music  learning  and  participation  within  non-formal  community  contexts.  Critical  questions  will  be  considered,  relating  to  the  meaning  and  implications  of  enjoyment  in  learning,  the  challenges  in  implementing  collaborative  or  co-operative  pedagogies,  and  potential  tensions  relating  to  the  ideas  of  assessment  and  progression  within  `progressive`  pedagogical  frameworks.

SOCIETY  FOR  EDUCATION  AND  MUSIC  PSYCHOLOGY  RESEARCH  RESEARCHING  MUSIC  -  EDUCATION  -  TECHNOLOGY  (MET2018)

26–27  March  2018,  Senate  House,  University  of  London

Creative  music  technologies  for  enriching  later-life  

In  this  paper  I  explore  the  potential  for  creative  music  technologies  to  enrich  opportunities  for  wellbeing  and  creativity  in  later-life.  I  will  address  the  question  of  what  may  be  the  underpinning  theoretical  principles  that  could  frame  the  design  and  use  of  later-life  creative  music  technologies.    There  is  a  small  but  growing  body  of  research  suggesting  that  older  people,  even  those  with  complex  needs,  are  capable  of,  and  interested  in  using  music  technologies.  Using  some  examples  of  practice,  I  will  highlight  the  multiple  and  significant  benefits  that  may  be  derived  from  receptive  or  active  creative  music-making  supported  by  a  range  of  music  technologies.  Speaking  from  the  perspective  of  a  ͚digital  immigrant͛  for  whom  digital  music  technologies  represent  a  landscape  that  can  feel  unfamiliar  and  even  bewildering,  I  nonetheless  argue  in  favour  of  the  crucial  importance  of  exploiting  opportunities  to  use  creative  digital  technologies  to  support  continued  playful,  exploratory,  and  joyful  musical  experience.

CREATIVE  AGEING  SYMPOSIUM

25-26  October  2017,  Griffith  University,  Brisbane  Australia

Collaborative,  Creative  and  Critical:  Musical  encounters  in  later  life

 Within  our  global  context  where  centenarians  represent  the  fastest  growing  age  group,  significant  challenges  relating  to  social  isolation,  depression  and  chronic  disease  amongst  older  people  have  been  highlighted.  In  response,  increasing  attention  has  been  directed  towards  the  potential  for  collaborative,  creative  opportunities  to  support  a  humanised  old  age.  Later-life  can  be  a  period  of  profound  creativity,  where  older  people  use  creative  outlets  for  reflection  on  their  own  unique  stories,  personal  healing  and  spiritual  growth.  It  is  within  creative  spaces  that  elders  can  explore  new  ways  of  being,  of  belonging,  and  of  becoming,  and  experience  a  continuing  sense  of  citizenship.  Adopting  the  theoretical  lens  of  a  salutogenic  model  of  health,  concerned  with  how  we  support  positive  adjustment  to  health  changes,  I  will  explore  the  pathways  by  which  collaborative  and  creative  musical  encounters  can  promote  sense  of  coherence  in  our  later  lives.  I  will  draw  on  some  case  study  examples,  arguing  that  musical  social  networks,  and  in  particular  opportunities  for  intergenerational  collaboration,  may  can  function  as  a  space  for  creative  ageing,  including  a  psychological  component  (e.g.  empowerment,  meaningfulness,  identity,  belonging),  a  behavioural  component  (e.g.,  effort,  intensity,  focused  concentration),  and  positive  physiological  outcomes  that  contribute  to  shared  emotional,  relational  or  affirmative  outcomes.  

INDIVIDUUM  ↔  COLLECTIVUM:  NACHKLÄNGE  EIN  INTERDISZIPLINÄRES  SYMPOSION  IM  RAHMEN  VON  „SPARKLING  SCIENCE“  UNIVERSITÄT  MOZARTEUM  SALZBURG

9.  und  20.  März  2014

Facilitating  creative  and  collaborative  musical  ensembles  

Musical  performance  is  an  inherently  social  activity  and  musical  ensembles  offer  a  powerful  context  for  fostering  deep  learning  in  music.  Yet,  the  ability  to  negotiate  and  collaborate  with  one’s  co-performers  to  generate  musically  cohesive,  imaginative  and  convincing  performances  does  not  come  easily  to  everyone.  In  this  session  I  will  explore  the  importance  of  peer  interdependence  in  musical  learning,  focusing  on  the  role  of  the  coach  or  facilitator  in  maximising  the  potential  for  collaborative  and  creative  music  making  in  groups.  The  group  dynamics,  processes  and  properties  found  in  ensembles  of  varying  types  and  sizes  will  be  considered  within  a  framework  comprising  musical,  perceptual  and  social  skills  that  underpin  creative  music  making.  Case  study  examples  will  demonstrate  how,  in  a  range  of  musical  contexts,  musical  coaches/facilitators  might  support  group  members  in  developing  these  skills.  I  will  conclude  by  offering  some  points  of  reflection  with  regard  to  how  facilitators  and  students  might  apply  the  key  messages  within  their  own  practice.    

 

COURSES

SÉMINAIRE SUR LES PRATIQUES COLLECTIVES DE LA MUSIQUE

ATELIERS EN PÉDAGOGIE INSTRUMENTALE

RESEARCH SUPERVISION:
SUPERVISE MASTERS AND DOCTORAL STUDENT RESEARCH IN MUSIC EDUCATION AND LIFELONG LEARNING

 
 
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